BREAKTHROUGHS BLOG

October 05, 2014

Research Roundup: Intellectual property awards, FDA priorities, Australia R&D, and more

Senior Program Assistant
GHTC

In this regular feature on Breakthroughs, we highlight some of the most interesting reads in global health research from the past week.

GHTC member PATH—along with the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Serum Institute of India (SII)—will receive a national award for this year’s most outstanding intellectual property licensing deal for the group’s technology transfer of the MenAfriVac™ vaccine—a low-cost meningitis vaccine specifically developed for people in sub-Saharan Africa. The 2014 Deal of Distinction Award—which recognizes excellence in licensing deals—will be presented to the group by the Licensing Executives Society at its annual meeting in early October.

In a recent FDA Voice blog post, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Margaret Hamburg writes about FDA’s new strategic priorities. Given that the FDA continues to expand its global reach, and that nearly 40 percent of medicines Americans consume are developed outside the United States, the agency has established five strategic priorities: regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Policy Cures writes in their monthly update, RADAR, about recent news on global health research and development in Australia. Australia has committed AUD$30 million in annual funding to health research for development—including $10 million for product development partnerships. Five million dollars of funding could also be used for a health innovation fund (possibly a Grand Challenges Australia).

As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues, the Center for Global Development looks at ways to find a cure for this deadly disease. They argue that two things are needed: cost-effective thresholds for investments in global health, and an Advance Market Commitment to accelerate the development of new vaccines for Ebola and other neglected diseases.

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