Select a State

Global health R&D delivers for Washington

US government investment in global health R&D has delivered

$783.9 million
to Washington research institutions
9,700+ new jobs
for Washington

Neglected diseases in Washington

Chikungunya cases
66
Dengue cases
108
HIV diagnoses
4,338
Malaria cases
211
Tuberculosis cases
1,923
West Nile cases
93
Zika cases
82
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Washington's top USG-funded global health R&D institutions

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
$449.8 million
University of Washington (including Harborview Medical Center)
$156.9 million
Center for Infectious Disease Research (formerly Seattle Biomed, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, SBRI)
$91.5 million
PATH
$33.8 million
Infectious Disease Research Institute
$29.1 million
The Geneva Foundation
$5.1 million
Institute for Systems Biology
$4.4 million
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
$4.3 million
Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason
$2.8 million
Washington State University
$2.1 million
Seattle Children's Hospital (including Seattle Children's Research Institute)
$1.9 million
Global Health Cooperative (nor part of Kaiser Permanente)
$1.4 million
Gonzaga University
$505 thousand
Central Washington University
$361 thousand

Washington industry in global health R&D

Bristol-Myers Squibb
Location(s):
Seattle
Celgene
Location(s):
Seattle
InBios
Location(s):
Seattle
Micronics
Location(s):
Redmont
MSR Global Health
Location(s):
Seattle
Nortis Bio
Location(s):
Seattle, Woodenville

Washington's top areas of global health R&D by USG funding

66.9%
HIV/AIDS
9.5%
Malaria
8.2%
Tuberculosis
4.0%
Salmonella infections
6.5%
Neglected tropical diseases
Buruli ulcer
Dengue
Helminths
Kinetoplastids
Leprosy
Trachoma
5.0%
Other
Bacteria pneumonia & meningitis
Diarrheal diseases
Ebola/viral hemorrhagic fevers
Non-allocable

Global health R&D at work in Washington

Several million babies born each year in Africa and Asia can’t breastfeed due to prematurity or cleft lip or palate. Tools such as breast pumps and bottles are impractical and unhygienic in settings that lack clean water and electricity. To help save these infants from starving, the University of Washington, Seattle Children’s, and PATH developed the NIFTY cup, a soft, silicone bowl with a tiny reservoir that allows these infants to lap up lifesaving breast milk.

Footnotes